FDA OKs Gilead’s Drug Combo for HIV
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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Gilead Sciences’ Genvoya (elvitegravir 150 mg/cobicistat 150 mg/emtricitabine 200 mg/tenofovir alafenamide 10 mg or E/C/F/TAF) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Genvoya is the first TAF-based regimen to receive FDA approval, according to Gilead.

Genvoya is indicated as a complete regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults and pediatric patients 12 years of age and older who have no antiretroviral treatment history or to replace the current antiretroviral regimen in those who are virologically-suppressed (HIV-1 RNA levels less than 50 copies per mL) on a stable antiretroviral regimen for at least six months with no history of treatment failure and no known substitutions associated with resistance to the individual components of Genvoya. No dosage adjustment of Genvoya is required in patients with estimated creatinine clearance greater than or equal to 30 mL per minute.

Two other TAF-based regimens are currently under evaluation by the FDA. The first is an investigational, fixed-dose combination of emtricitabine 200 mg and tenofovir alafenamide 25 or 10 mg (F/TAF) for use in combination with other antiretroviral agents. The second is an investigational, once-daily single tablet regimen that combines emtricitabine 200 mg, tenofovir alafenamide 25 mg and rilpivirine 25 mg (R/F/TAF). Emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide are from Gilead and rilpivirine is from Janssen Sciences Ireland UC, one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson.

Genvoya contains a new form of tenofovir that has not been previously approved, according to the FDA. This new form of tenofovir provides lower levels of drug in the bloodstream, but higher levels within the cells where HIV-1 replicates. It was developed to help reduce some drug side effects. Genvoya appears to be associated with less kidney toxicity and decreases in bone density than previously approved tenofovir containing regimens based on laboratory measures. Patients receiving Genvoya experienced greater increases in serum lipids (total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein) than patients receiving other treatment regimens in the studies, according to FDA.

Source: Gilead Sciences and US Food and Drug Administration

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